Daniel Romano – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – February 23rd, 2019

Daniel Romano

Juno-nominated Canadian songwriter, Attack in Black member and Julie Doiron collaborator

Daniel Romano

Thayer Sarrano

Sat, February 23, 2019

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12 ADV / $14 DOS

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats

Daniel Romano
Daniel Romano
Finally Free marks Daniel Romano’s eighth long playing album in the last eight years. He has had what understatedly would be considered a prolific output of incredibly entrancing, poignant and creative records in this span of time. Recording, producing, designing and landing his records into the minds and hearts of scores of fans the world over. He has been called a shapeshifter, contrived, a chameleon, a Charlatan, the best living songwriter, an asshole and a genius. His last record, Modern Pressure received outstandingly high acclaim and praise from every notable publication out there and was acknowledged by most reputable “for-profit-prize-corporations” as well as a plethora of voguish “music-as-competitive-sport” year end lists. Despite being the bronze placeholder in most of these dogfights, he is most often noted as a person of astounding influence on all of his musically economic successors.
“No matter what he does, everything he puts out is better than anything else being put out by anyone else.” – Unnamed Subjugate.
Romano’s new effort Finally Free could stand alone as being pivotal if it were only its profound and breathtaking prose on paper. Writing now like an agnostic Whitman in his prime, Romano explores and uncovers new language and meaning for old sentiments grown tired, stating, “these poems are most certainly my finest and most principled efforts to date.” Finally Free sings like a radical revelation, exploring the concepts of music as a celestial being, flora as a consequential ancestor and singing, no matter its quality or sound, as the end most important output of our species. This record contains a vivid religious articulation despite its clear condemnation of a God as a singular ruling white male. New words have replaced old words for new meaning and the definitions have been left up to interpretation. It seems safe to say that Romano has broken the literary soil hard and ferociously to find the remaining repose in our current “danse macabre.”
This masterful record could easily transfix listeners if it were merely a collection of beautifully arranged and recorded instrumentals. Romano told me this record was recorded with one single microphone in “sitting vocal position”. He went on to say “I wrote the songs as I recorded them and I had a guitar amplifier to my right and a bass amplifier to my left. The drums were behind me and my chair in the middle. The microphone never moved no matter what instrument I was recording and the preamp settings never changed. I basically mixed the room instead of the individual tracks.” Finally Free was recorded on a 4 track Tascam cassette
recorder. This means Romano was making constant stream of consciousness commitments to everything that was being recorded in order to bounce them down to stereo and free up tracks for additional elements. A method virtually unused by his peers. “On every record I make strict limitations for myself. This was by far the most extreme, but I also believe it has rendered the most honest and liberating results.” Romano, no matter how many times I asked, wouldn’t disclose what microphone was used.
Overall, this record harks back to Romano’s early studies and obsessions in traditional folk music while simultaneously conveying a surprisingly modern and engaging aesthetic. Dense with new wisdom and blissfully encouraging in these end times.
Finally Free is available everywhere worth going November, 30th, 2018 on You’ve Changed Records in Canada and New West Records everywhere else.
Thayer Sarrano
Thayer Sarrano
"Thayer Sarrano is forging her own path into a southern-psych-dreamland, bottling up ghosts and bringing them to life through her ethereal desert rock hymns. Sarrano's sound stems mainly from her eclectic background. She was raised in a monastic seminary, then coastal/swampland in South Georgia, classically trained as a child and wrote instrumental compositions and poetry. She merged into a songwriter when she attended art school in the vibrant musical community of Athens, GA and began to collaborate with friends to form her band, as well as establish herself as a studio/touring session player (Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven, T. Hardy Morris, Dave Marr, David Barbe, Of Montreal, Kuroma...). Debut album, King was released in 2009 dubbing her “The new Queen of Shoegaze” by Americana UK Magazine.

The follow up LP, Lift Your Eyes to the Hills (2012), features the single “The Bend,“ written for Groninger Museum, The Netherlands, leading to consistent European touring. The record was produced by Thayer and Hank Sullivant (Kuroma, MGMT), and was an independent release as a charitable campaign for Nuci’s Space’s teenage rock camp, “Camp Amped,” of which Thayer is passionately affiliated. “Featuring heavily spiritual themes, it could have collapsed under it’s own weight, but ‘Hill’s manages to maintain a startling lightness of being.“ -Flagpole Magazine.

Her latest release, Shaky, was described by The Huffington Post as, "A potent examination of grace and perseverance amidst loss and melancholia." Sarrano's honest, painted lyrics weave the mystical with personal experiences. We start to believe that these seemingly abstract visions are real, and in this other world we see pictures we can relate to. Pictures of dissolving relationships in “Crease”, "your memory unties my cells/ it breaks the line from your heart to mine…” Of the elusive in title track, "I trace your echo I follow your lead/ you’re shaky shaky but you settle me.” Of the search for something greater in “Glimpses,” “there’s a world at the same time as this one/it’s bright it trembles it glistens,” and of the mysterious ether in “Lost Art,” “their hands are open, call to the wild/ layer landscapes, breaking the sky/ I remember them from when I was a child/ it’s the same little image from inside my eyes…“

Dovetailing the thick twang of the country with the airy, echoing, spacious feeling of an empty church, Sarrano has carved out a pocket in which her otherworldly music has room to breathe. Or perhaps the pocket was already there and Sarrano stumbled upon it, becoming a vector for something deep and soulful and strange. Regardless, once you’ve stepped into that pocket with her, you’re bound to want to return.