Luke Temple / Marisa Anderson – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – March 30th, 2018

Luke Temple / Marisa Anderson

A co-headlined evening with the Brooklyn-based Here We Go Magic frontman and PDX folk guitar wizard

Luke Temple / Marisa Anderson

Forest Veil

Fri, March 30, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12 ADV / $14 DOS

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats 

Luke Temple
Luke Temple
I want to call Luke Temple a disciple of Hank Williams and Roger Miller. I want to call him an avant-garde traditionalist. I want to say he’s got an unmatched intuition for the askew. I want to say his only real contemporary peer is another master songsmith named Cass McCombs. I could make a pretty infallible case for any of these statements. But at the end of the day, it’d be adding too many bells and whistles to what his new album is. At its core, it’s one of the year’s most stunning folk records. You should just let Temple’s high-and-lonesome salve of a voice raise your goose-pimples from their dormancy. You should let his insightful, devastating lyrics make tiny, tender tears in your soul.

A Hand Through the Cellar Door is, in many ways, Temple’s most straightforward collection of song-storying tunes to date. There are tales of dysfunctional, broken homes and of dysfunctional, broken people. “Birds of Late December,” with its fluttering, nimble fingerpicking, paints an exacting but impressionistic portrait of divorce through the eyes of an exceptionally wistful child. In both “Maryanne Was Quiet” and “The Case of Louis Warren” we follow two characters whose lives unravel in very different ways, though their central question is the same: After you shed all the things you think make you who you are, what is left? Temple is creating small, confident stories with a massive scope - like a good Alice Munroe story. Album standout “The Complicated Men of the 1940s” is a thought experiment concerning the sacrifice of a passing generation, where the heroes of yesterday seem like the stuffy, old guard to a new generation that’s grown just a bit too entitled to their comfort.

But this being Temple and all - the creative mind behind Here We Go Magic - nothing is really ever so straightforward. The arrangements, kept to a minimal drums/guitar/bass/string set-up here, expand and contract in unexpected ways.Temple writes with the eye of a painter like Eric Fischl. Whereas Fischl will put a subtle provocative image in the margins of a piece to create a feeling of imbalance, Temple will add a guitar hiccup or a just-behind-the-beat string section to create a sensation of everything being slightly off. And in that imbalance, both artists show us grace. Yes, while the tales Temple weaves are bleak, the aura of hope never quite fades from the picture. He turns the tragedies of human folly into a celebration of our eccentricities.
Marisa Anderson
Marisa Anderson
Combining boundless creative imagination with a deep reverence for American folk, blues and country music, MARISA ANDERSON's guitar playing is fluid, emotional, dexterous and original. Signal to Noise magazine calls Anderson's guitar work "Utterly fabulous", TIme Out London refers to her playing as "Stunning…haunting and evocative", Pitchfork calls her latest record, 'Mercury', "Brilliant" and Wire Magazine says, "Her sound has strength in restless variety…Anderson's playing is heartfelt and utterly American, free from grandstanding and steeped in respect for the old tradition." Before going solo in 2009, Anderson played guitar in the Dolly Ranchers and the Evolutionary Jass Band. In the past two years, Anderson's music has landed her festival appearances in Europe and the United States and opening slots for artists including Godspeed You! Black Emperor, The Devil Makes 3 and Sharon Van Etten. In August 2013, KBOO Community Radio released a split 7″ featuring Anderson and Elizabeth Cotton. Anderson's music has been featured on NPR and on soundtracks including 'Smokin' Fish', 'For the Love of Dolly', 'Girls Rock', and 'Gift To Winter'. Her writings on music and activism have appeared in Bitch Magazine, Leaf Litter, and in Rock 'n' Roll Camp for Girls, the book. Her new album, "Traditional and Public Domain Songs," is now available from the Grapefruit Record Club.
Forest Veil
Forest Veil (formerly known as Moniker) is the solo project of multi-instrumentalist/producer Monica Metzler, based in Portland, OR. Following the echoes of her elusive muse, Forest Veil makes mystical "doom-folk" that maps the emotional terrain of humanity and its place in the cosmos.

Melding a voice that sounds like smokey quartz with psychedelic guitar riffs, and enigmatic lyricism, Forest Veil’s sound evokes a haunting nostalgia for other worlds and connects her in a web of resonating strings to the troubadours of time. Though she writes and records on her own, Forest Veil plays live shows with a full band (drums, bass, guitar, and keys/synth).