SOLD OUT: A Place To Bury Strangers – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – June 12th, 2018

SOLD OUT: A Place To Bury Strangers

Critically acclaimed Brookyln post-punk trio returns to PDX with new LP, 'Pinned'

SOLD OUT: A Place To Bury Strangers

Sextile, Tender Age

Tue, June 12, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$14 ADV / $16 DOS

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats 

SOLD OUT: A Place To Bury Strangers
SOLD OUT: A Place To Bury Strangers
Try, if only for a moment, to envision a scenario in which you could still be completely *surprised* by a rock band. It’s not easy. In fact, it’s increasingly rare.

A couple of years ago, A Place to Bury Strangers were in search of a new drummer. Lia Simone Braswell, an L.A. native, had recently moved to New York, and was playing drums in shows around Brooklyn “just to keep her chops up.” As it turned out, APTBS bassist Dion Lunadon caught one of those shows and, after seeing her play, was moved to ask her if she’d want to come to a band practice sometime.

“I told some of my friends about it before I met up with them,” Braswell says, of the rehearsal that would soon lead to her joining the band. “They told me, ‘You’re just gonna have to keep up as much as you possibly can.’”

“To be fair, she had also never seen us live,” Lunadon adds. “She didn’t necessarily know what she was getting into.”

What she was getting into: For well over a decade now, A Place to Bury Strangers—Lunadon, founding guitarist/singer Oliver Ackermann, and, officially, Braswell—have become well known for their unwavering commitment to unpredictable, often bewildering live shows, and total, some might say dangerous volume. They don’t write setlists. They frequently write new songs mid-set. They deliberately provoke and sabotage sound people in a variety of cruel yet innovative ways. They can and will always surprise you. “When something goes wrong on-stage, a lot of bands will crumble under the pressure,” says Ackermann. “We like the idea of embracing the moment when things go wrong and turning it into the best thing about the show.”

This April marks the release of Pinned, their fifth full-length and an album that finds them converting difficult moments into some of their most urgent work to date. It’s their first since the 2016 election, and their first since the 2014 closing of Death By Audio, the beloved Brooklyn DIY space where Ackerman lived, worked, and created with complete freedom. “After DBA closed, I moved to an apartment in Clinton Hill,” he says. “I couldn’t make too much noise, couldn’t disturb my neighbors. I would just sit there and write with a drum machine. It had to be about writing a good song and not about being super, sonically loud.”

There are searing meditations on truth and government-led conspiracies (“Execution”), as well as haunting, harmonized responses to the tensions of our current political climate (“There’s Only One of Us”). It all opens with “Never Coming Back,” a frightening crescendo of group vocals, vertiginous guitar work, and Lunadon’s unrelenting bass. “That song is a big concept,” Ackermann says. “You make these decisions in your life…you’re contemplating whether or not this will be the end. You think of your mortality, those moments you could die and what that means. You’re thinking about that edge of the end, deciding whether or not it’s over. When you’re close to that edge, you could teeter over.”

It’s a clear and honest statement of intent, not just for everything that follows, but for this band as a whole. “As things go on, you don’t want them to be stagnant,” Ackermann says. “Being a band for ten years, it’s hard to keep things moving forward. I see so many bands that have been around and they’re a weaker version of what they used to be. This band is anti-that. We try to push ourselves constantly, with the live shows and the recordings. We always want to get better. You’ve got to dig deep and take chances, and sometimes, I questioned that. It took really breaking through to make it work. I think we did that.”

They definitely did.
Sextile
Sextile
As a stable fixture in the Los Angeles underground, Sextile has been gaining a devout following since its creation in 2015. The four-piece outfit has all the makings of a revolutionary sound — boldly throwing convention out the window to create an entirely original, genre-bending imprint that combines the raw energy of 70’s punk with the intricate and sophisticated structural elements of 80’s post-punk and synthwave.
Sextile’s first release, A Thousand Hands, had a signature sound that was a dark and primitive form of rock n’ roll, a blend of surf punk, early industrial, and post-punk marked by heavy use of distorted guitar feedback and primal drum beats against a backdrop of violent energy. The album caught steam with each flailing, chaotic performance and, responding to demand, the band played endlessly around the Los Angeles area. They toured the west coast frequently, including a standout run with The Soft Moon. When Sextile assumes the stage, the band members truly draw energy from the air, electrifying the crowd to the point where the stage and the venue feel as if they might collapse at any moment. Brady Keehn’s powerful vocals bounce effortlessly off of Eddie Wuebben’s hypnotic synth lines, which mix in perfectly with Melissa Scaduto’s commanding stand-up drumming style. Holding it all together is the piercing delay feedback and self-contained noise from the guitars of Keehn and Sammy Warren.

After hunkering down in a basement in Echo Park to record for a couple weeks, Sextile is back with their sophomore LP, Albeit Living. The album is a testament to the band’s growth in the songwriting department and effort spent fine-tuning their burgeoning compositional skills: the synth is in the forefront on this album, allowing it to shine through more powerfully than we saw on A Thousand Hands. Despite its more sophisticated sound, the album manages to match and even intensify the seductive energy of their live shows and debut album. In true DIY spirit, the band members were involved in almost every aspect of making the record. Keehn engineered and mixed the album while Warren acted as assistant engineer. The album was produced by Keehn and Scaduto and co-produced by Warren.

The ten-song LP is a strong statement as a follow-up to their primitive debut, and while it re-defines Sextile’s sound, the real impact the album has is the way it decisively breaks the rules and guidelines set out by conventional genres and strives to create something truly unique and genre-altering. The album launches abruptly, pulling you almost instantaneously into its orbit of hard-hitting up-tempo drum beats, haunting synth hooks, and enough guitar feedback to make Kevin Shields blush. Energy and passion combust as the members feed off each other to create a brand of post-punk that combines the formidable noise and feedback of Psychocandy-era Jesus & Mary Chain, the frostbitten analog synth melodies of Cabaret Voltaire, the myth of Public Image Ltd., and the dark soundscapes of bands like D.A.F. and Section 25.

Albeit Living is out on felte July 14th, 2017.
Tender Age
Tender Age
Tender Age’s particular brand of noise-infused pop music feels like being pulled into an automatic car wash, but instead of hot multi-colored foam, it's guitars coating you, and after being blown dry you emerge from the tunnel shimmering and glossy. The music can feel as euphoric at times as it does dark and complicated at others. Indeed, balancing contradictions is what the band does best. They juxtapose beauty with dissonance, punctuate accessible melodies with dense noise freakouts, and write cryptic vocals that come across as deeply personal while being vague enough to be universally relatable. Fans of Sonic Youth, The Breeders, and My Bloody Valentine will appreciate common threads they love about those bands weaving throughout Tender Age’s music, but with a refreshing lack of genre clichés or tribute band vibes.


The Portland, Oregon five piece have released a pair of 7” singles and a 12" EP since the band first formed in 2013. Since a lineup change in 2017 brought Olives to the band, the group has experienced a new level of cohesion and a wave of productivity that resulted in Becoming Real Forever, the band’s first full length release, as well as a yet to be titled EP that has already been written and recorded that is likely to come out this Fall.


Tender Age on "Becoming Real Forever" (slated for release 7/8/18) -
Tender Age recorded Becoming Real Forever themselves using a 16-track tape machine in a cabin they transformed into a makeshift all-analog recording studio on the Oregon coast over two weeks in mid 2017. They snaked mic cables through heating vents in the wood paneling and along the worn shag carpet under doors, tracking everything live in the living room as tourists walked by gawking through a huge picture window, bewildered by the racket emanating from within. It doesn’t sound like a “beach” album, but it’s deeply connected to the sunny, dreary Oregon coast and to the experiences the band had sharing that weird little cabin with each other and the friends who visited them.