Three For Silver VS Human Ottoman – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – March 14th, 2018

Three For Silver VS Human Ottoman

Freewheeling Northwest post-folk outfits with mind-bending tunes strewn with jazz and funk

Three For Silver VS Human Ottoman

Eliza Rickman

Wed, March 14, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$10 ADV / $12 DOS

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats 

Three For Silver
Three For Silver
Three For Silver runs off the friction of opposing forces. Thunderous bass and dreamy melody, baritone growl and smooth soprano, new music and timeworn style. The band creates a sound that is both wholly unique and yet familiar. If it's retro, no one has found its time period. If it's folk music, no one has found its country of origin.
Human Ottoman
Human Ottoman
Human Ottoman is Susan Lucía (drums), Matthew Cartmill (cello), and Grayson Fiske (vibraphone). After meeting in Eugene, Oregon as music school misfits, they joined forces, quickly creating a repertoire of raucous, rhythmically dynamic music which combined their enthusiasm for music of all cultures with classical backgrounds and modern genre-mashing-jazz sensibilities, characterized most of all by their unique instrumentation. Their first album, aptly named "Power Baby", was independently released in May of 2014. Since then, they have been actively ear-pillaging throughout the west coast. From brain-crashing cello solos and atomic vibraphone drops to drum solos that scholars are still struggling to understand, Human Ottoman is bringing polyrhythmic world-metal to the masses.
Eliza Rickman
Eliza Rickman
There is always a hint of menace and reservoirs of force haunting the corners of Eliza Rickman’s voice, whatever register it occupies. Her presence on stage- whether she wears flowers in her hair, or stuffed birds; whether she plays a toy piano or a grand piano- is an enveloping, soft darkness, impossible to ignore. It has been three years between Rickman's first album, O, You Sinners, and her newest effort, Footnotes for the Spring. In those intervening three years, Rickman added the autoharp to her repertoire, fought illness and heartbreak (and won), and turned 30. But mostly, she toured. She is a frequent featured musical act for the live rendition of the popular podcast Welcome to Night Vale, she joined the band Rasputina for a handful of dates, and she organized her own successful solo European tour.

During those three years, Rickman’s vocal delivery has also developed a new breathlessness. She wrote all the string arrangements on her debut. But friend Jason Webley produced and orchestrated Footnotes. Here, Rickman’s voice casts its shadow against Webley’s shimmering strings and a Phil Spector style wall of sound, flecked with melancholy and nostalgia. This clutch of songs comprises, among others, “Lark of my Heart”, written to commemorate the wedding day of Margaret Rucker, an unknown poet whose scrapbook was found in a dumpster many years after her death; “Now and Then”, whose opening lines encapsulate the juxtaposition at the heart of the album- Oh, to be young again/blood is on my hands- and “Wax Nostalgic”, whose title speaks for itself. But this is nostalgia without sentimentality. Rickman’s voice has the power to hold the smallest grain of sadness, an intimation that the longed-for innocence depicted in her lyrics has slipped just below the glow of the orchestra and out of sight.