Holiday Friends / Norman – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – November 24th, 2019

Holiday Friends / Norman
A double-header of Portland indie-pop/rock with experimental dance elements

Holiday Friends / Norman

$10.00
Ages 21+
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MOSTLY STANDING / LIMITED BALCONY SEATING

DOORS 7PM / SHOW 8PM

$10 ADV / $12 DOS

THIS EVENT IS 21+

VALID U.S. ID OR PASSPORT REQUIRED FOR ENTRY

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Holiday Friends

FACEBOOK

Holiday Friends is an indie rock band from Astoria, OR. Founding members Scott Fagerland, Jon Fagerland, and Zack O’Connor formed the band while attending University in Moscow, Idaho. After a few years of experimentation, they solidified their lineup with Portland musician Joey Ficken (Sea Wolf, Swords) The band recorded their official debut, “Major Magic” with Kevin Robinson (Viva Voce, Blue Giant) at Woodlawn Studios in Portland, OR. The album was released in 2014 to a sold-out crowd at Portland’s Mississippi Studios. Holiday Friends’ upbeat, danceable, synth-rock has landed them on Portland’s Alternative Radio 94.7 FM, OPB Music, and TV shows Shameless and MTV’s Awkward.

Since then Holiday Friends has built their own studio in Astoria, OR where they continually record music in conjunction with L.A. based producer, and audio engineer, Chris Sorem (Avi Buffalo, Vulfpeck, Rufus Wainright). With their latest EP entitled “Most of Us” the group hones in on the pop and dance elements that they are known for, while also expanding their use of samples, and experimental production. The title track pulses along with a club style kick drum, and even makes good use of the iconic, albeit cliché “orchestra hit”. Still, it’s hard to resist the urge to move to such a well-crafted bop! Juxtaposed with the upbeat feel of the record, are singer Scott Fagerland’s introspective lyrics about getting older, and struggling to maintain living the dual lifestyle that is an inevitable part of being in an indie band.

“Since 2008, the Astoria band Holiday Friends has specialized in exuberant pop-rock music, stuffing songs with vibrant synths, driving rhythms and earworm melodies.” -1859 Magazine

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Norman

FACEBOOK

If nostalgia is a yearning to be “at home,” then all memory might be pain. What good is it, then? Longstanding indie rock band, Norman, question the usefulness of memory on their fourth studio album, Buzz and Fade. The new release of 10 original songs are carried by a renewed energy, out this October from Hey Amigo! Recording Co. The sweeping synthesizers and anthemic guitars that have defined Norman for over a decade shine through on these energetic songs, and the band characteristically hints at different eras of rock and different eras of their own musical past while taking them in a new direction entirely. That direction feeds directly into Norman’s methodical dismantling of nostalgia as a useful way of seeing the present. Buzz and Fade encounters memory again and again, each time choosing to see the ways memories fail to represent reality, the ways change is better than stagnation, the ways reinvention is an improvement on maintenance of old habits and old feelings. In today’s world, it’s hard not to long for change when nostalgia for the past is so closely related to the pain of the less fortunate. The result is a collection of songs that form a sincere, biting assessment of personal nostalgia gone sour. Buzz and Fade confronts the idea that the world need to look fondly on the past. The future is change.

If nostalgia is a yearning to be “at home,” then all memory might be pain. What good is it, then?

Longstanding indie rock band, Norman, question the usefulness of memory on their fourth studio album, Buzz and Fade. The new release of 10 original songs are carried by a renewed energy, out this October from Hey Amigo! Recording Co. The sweeping synthesizers and anthemic guitars that have defined Norman for over a decade shine through on these energetic songs, and the band characteristically hints at different eras of rock and different eras of their own musical past while taking them in a new direction entirely.

That direction feeds directly into Norman’s methodical dismantling of nostalgia as a useful way of seeing the present. Buzz and Fade encounters memory again and again, each time choosing to see the ways memories fail to represent reality, the ways change is better than stagnation, the ways reinvention is an improvement on maintenance of old habits and old feelings. In today’s world, it’s hard not to long for change when nostalgia for the past is so closely related to the pain of the less fortunate.

The result is a collection of songs that form a sincere, biting assessment of personal nostalgia gone sour. Buzz and Fade confronts the idea that the world need to look fondly on the past. The future is change.