Low Roar – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – October 7th, 2017

Low Roar

Reykjavík via Oakland somber folk project from Ryan Joseph Karazija (Audrye Sessions)

Low Roar

Charlie Cunningham

Sat, October 7, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$13 ADV / $15 DOS

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats

Low Roar
Low Roar
Bay Area native, Ryan Karazija, has found inspiration in Reykjavik, Iceland. It's this inspiration that epitomizes the sound of Low Roar, which Pigeons & Planes describes as "wonderfully evocative music" and Acid Stag hails as the "Icelandic version of Grizzly Bear".

After moving to the small Nordic community in 2010, Karazija wrote and recorded Low Roar's debut self-titled album with the help of Grammy winning producer/mixer Andrew Scheps (Red Hot Chili Peppers, Adele). After releasing the album in November 2011, Karazija recruited drummer Logi Guðmundsson and the two toured Germany, Poland, Lithuania and a myriad of other European countries, eventually joining the Iceland Airwaves and ATP festival lineups, as well as supporting indie favorite Soko.

Now with Leifur Björnsson on keys, Low Roar is releasing their second album, 0, on July 8, 2014 which features Icelandic darlings Amiina on strings and is co-produced by Andrew Scheps and Mike Lindsay (Tuung).
Charlie Cunningham
Charlie Cunningham
Growing up in a small town in the periphery of London, guitar and piano were a big part of Charlie’s life. “The whole ability to write songs is probably in a lot more people than they think. A lot of people can probably do it; it’s just hard knowing how to start,’ he admits. “I think what slowed me down was just over-thinking every possible thing. So now I know that if something feels right to just trust that.”

After a few years gigging and finding his feet in Oxford he left for Seville and ended up staying for two years. It was here he explored the different attitudes towards the guitar, and developed a fresh technique that was a catalyst for his creativity. Taking the percussive qualities of flamenco, his playing became sharp enough to craft songs laden with delicate flourishes, intricate melodic turns, and moments of stark introspection. His work continues to be both expansive and intimate.

“I guess the reason that it took so long for me to put something out was that I couldn’t play the way I wanted to play” he explains. “I knew how I wanted it to be, but I just couldn’t do it. I gave myself quite a tough time.”

But this perfectionist streak results in some truly wonderful moments of musicality. Charlie Cunningham’s enormously suggestive songwriting is sonically beautiful while also packing an emotional punch.