SOLD OUT: Big Thief – Tickets – Mississippi Studios – Portland, OR – March 4th, 2017

SOLD OUT: Big Thief

Powerful indie rock from Brooklyn with a stunning Saddle Creek debut album, 'Masterpiece'

SOLD OUT: Big Thief

iji, Henry Jamison

Sat, March 4, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$12 ADV / $14 DOS

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

Mostly Standing / Limited Balcony Seats 

Big Thief
Big Thief
Big Thief’s music, rooted in the songs of Adrianne Lenker, paints in vivid tones “the process of harnessing pain, loss, and love, while simultaneously letting go, looking into your own eyes through someone else’s, and being okay with the inevitability of death,” says Adrianne.
Masterpiece, Big Thief’s debut album (Saddle Creek), is filled with characters and visceral narratives, songs that pivot in tthiehe space of a few words. Adrianne’s voice and guitar playing speak of rich emotional territory with grace and insight. In her words, the record tracks “the masterpiece of existence, which is always folding into itself, people attempting to connect, to both shake themselves awake and to shake off the numbness of certain points in their life. The interpretations might be impressionistic or surrealistic, but they’re grounded in simple things.
Adrianne met her longtime musical partner, guitarist and singer, Buck Meek, in Brooklyn a few years ago, and they quickly formed a creative bond tempered by the experience of traveling and performing for months on end in old dive bars, yards, barns, and basements together. They recorded a pair of duo albums (A-Sides and B-Sides), and Adrianne showcased her songs on a solo album, Hours Were The Birds.
Now, as a full rock and roll band, with Buck on guitar, Max Oleartchik on bass, and James Krivchenia on drums, they bring a steady wildness, giving the songs an even deeper layer of nostalgia. “These guys feel like a pack of wolves at my back,” says Adrianne, “they make the songs howl and bark with a fierce tenderness that gives me courage.”
After spending a month in an old house that they turned into a studio on Lake Champlain with producer Andrew Sarlo, the resulting collection soars on what Big Thief fan Sharon Van Etten calls “… a real journey, with intelligent stories and twist-and-turn melodies.”
iji
Zach Burba (Songs, Instruments), Will Murdoch (Bass, Synth ), Jake Jones (Drums), Evan Easthope (Guitar), Tyler Martin (Synth)
Henry Jamison
Assuming that a pedigree in such things has any relevance at all, which is certainly unclear, Henry Jamison was perhaps predisposed to songwriting. His great-great-great-great-great-great-great (etc.) grandfather was the 14th century poet John Gower (friend to Chaucer and Richard II) and his great-great-great-great grandfather was George Frederick Root, the most popular songwriter of the Civil War era. Probably more relevant is that his mother is an English professor and his father a classical composer, who gave him a Korg 8-track recorder and his first guitar.

Henry attended a Waldorf School near his hometown of Burlington, VT, sang in a traveling folk choir and played viola in local youth orchestras. After an academically turbulent stint as an English major at Bowdoin College in Maine, he left on tour for two years with a band of bearded friends. This period was full of joys and sorrows and ended in a move back home. After a few attempts at recording a solo debut with a cadre of talented players, Henry decided to demo some new ideas on his old Korg 8-track, which would go on to become The Rains EP. These songs show a central interest in exploring inner worlds, observing their treasures and holding none in contempt. They run the gamut from an earnest reckoning with romantic upheaval ("Real Peach"), to a knee-jerk and distorted view of the same ("Through a Glass"), to storm-driven dreamscapes ("The Rains" and "Dallas Love Field"). Finally, in "No One Told Me," Henry stands metaphorically on his own "Galleons Lap" (the summit where Christopher Robin says Goodbye-for-Now to the Hundred Acre Wood in A.A. Milne's House at Pooh Corner) and looks out, with a newfound composure born of relationship, to the horizon of the Who-Knows-What that is the life of a musician.